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Inspiring Stories

This section provides stories of potential achieved through the hard work and support of our dedicated staff, committed donors, supportive caregivers, and most importantly inspirational patients who come through our doors everyday.

Included in this section you will also find links to our news and publications containing articles on our patients many achievements and generous donor support.

Rohan's Story

When brain injury happens at a young age, education can be a critical component of recovery. Eight-year-old Rohan Rai’s smile can light up any room. He loves to sing and can bring an audience to its feet with his rendition of “I’ll Always Love You,” which he performed at his school’s talent show last year. Seeing him today, you’d never guess that he has a brain injury. Learn more...

Liza's Story

Liza Patchel exudes poise in all she does - at home, in college and in her community where she works as a Red Cross volunteer. And so it seems ironic that poise can also be more literally defined as "a state of perfect physical balance," for Liza has cerebral palsy, "a disorder that affects one's ability to maintain one's balance." All we can say to that is, so much for definitions! Liza has rewritten the book. Learn more…

Melissa’s Story

“Sometimes, when people look at Melissa, they just see Down syndrome,” says Jay. “But when they look deeper, they see her abilities, not her disability.” Since Melissa was just a little girl, her parents have worked to give her wonderful and exciting experiences. They’ve traveled the world, they love going to the theatre, and they’ve had too many adventures to count. Learn more...

Janie and Lily’s Story

“Before we had the girls, I taught 5th and 6th grade, and I often had students with autism in my classroom,” says Ann. “You’d think I would have seen the signs in Lily, but autism is so different in younger children.” learn more...

Ben’s Story

One minute, everyone was enjoying a leisurely ride home on their bikes, and the next minute, tragedy struck when Ben was hit by a car. He was unconscious, and after paramedics determined the possibility of a brain injury, Ben was airlifted to a hospital three hours away. During the coming weeks, Joanne, her husband Dave, and their family could only wait and hope for the best. Learn more...

Erin and Jade’s Story

Erin and Jade sit across from one another in their bedroom, giggling and playing. Dressed in bright pinks and yellows, they look like little mirror images of one another, with one exception. While Jade perches on the bed, Erin sits in a tiny pink wheelchair because she is paralyzed from the chest down. Learn more...

Shane’s Story

This summer, I accomplished a dream that few people thought was possible. I was able to walk across the stage to get my high school diploma and then walk down the aisle with my graduating class at Kennedy Krieger High School. Looking out in the crowd to see my mom and friends and teachers standing and clapping for me—it was a moment I’ll never forget.. Learn more…

Imir’s Story

The first few years of my life, I didn’t know much about stability or security. I was in and out of foster care, living with six different families by the time I was eight years old.Then I met Bea and Larry Thomas, who became my foster parents. Learn more…

Maya's Story

Maya Simbulon may be tiny, but her joyous smile and infectious laugh make her the focus of any room she’s in. Maya has osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), a genetic disorder that makes her bones fragile and prone to breaks. At just 4 years old, Maya has endured 26 fractures—but she’s never afraid to try new things. Watching her 19-month-old sister stand and run across the room, Maya works hard to pull herself up, too, knowing that one false move could bring another painful break. Learn more…

Maloni Boys Story

Dominic Maloni could not have been a better baby. He was quiet and easy going. In his first year of life, he met all of the usual milestones - sitting up, speaking his first words, walking.

At 13 months, he could organize his toy cars in a line from smallest to largest. He could even figure out a puzzle designed for a 4-year-old in just two minutes. Still, he wouldn’t look his mother in the eye or turn around when his parents called his name. Learn more…